NEWS

February 24, 2019

Dual award PhD stipends in Global Ecology

Joint PhD stipends: Unlocking biodiversity dynamics for conservation

We are currently looking for enthusiast PhD students to work on a hot topic in global ecology: how the past can be used to reveal and manage responses of biodiversity to climate change.

The successful candidates will be enrolled in a dual award PhD program recently established between the University of Adelaide and University of Copenhagen.

These PhD projects will be part of a recently funded Australian Research Council Discovery Project, involving several senior and postdoctoral scientists. The successful candidates will work closely with this diverse and highly skilled group of international researchers. This new project is using fossils, ancient DNA and computational models to determine the ecological processes that (i) drive the structure and dynamics of species ranges and (ii) regulate the risk of extinction from global change. The successful candidates will also have access to state-of-the art computational facilities, recently compiled fossil records, paleoclimatic simulations and paleo genetic data.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Text-to-speech function is limited to 200 characters
 
[removed]
 
Options : History : Feedback : Donate Close

July 31, 2018

Position available: Computational ecologist

Research Associate to lead the development of a computational framework for reconstructing species’ range dynamics using spatially explicit demographic simulation models and ecological information from fossils and species’ genes. The resulting computational architecture will help to establish how past changes in climate, land-use and exploitation (and their interactions) have influenced the rate, strength and outcome of ecological processes of range movement and extinction; providing innovative solutions for protecting endangered species and ecosystems facing severe challenges in the 21st century. Supervision and mentoring will be provided by staff at the University of Adelaide, University of Tasmania and through the ARC Centre of Excellence for Biodiversity and Heritage.

 
 
G
M
T
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Text-to-speech function is limited to 200 characters
 
[removed]
 
Options : History : Feedback : Donate Close

July 31, 2018

Position available: Ecological Modeller (Global Change)

We are seeking a Postdoctoral Fellow to lead the development of spatially explicit demographic models that use characteristics of past population dynamics from fossils and species genes to reconstruct the range dynamics of select megafauna and medium-sized vertebrates in three broad geographic regions (Eurasia, America and Oceania) over the last 21,000 years. The resulting models will be used to identify the ecological processes that regulate the severity of threats from climate and land-use change, over-exploitation on range shifts and extinctions. They will also be used to develop the capacity to target conservation management resources more effectively to slow or redirect future range contractions. The successful candidate would work closely with a diverse and highly skilled group of researchers from the University of Adelaide, University of Copenhagen and the State University of New York.

 
 
G
M
T
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Text-to-speech function is limited to 200 characters
 
[removed]
 
Options : History : Feedback : Donate Close

February 26, 2018

We are currently looking for two enthusiast PhD students to work on a hot topic in global change ecology: how and why species ranges shift in response to global change.

The successful candidates will be enrolled in a dual award PhD program recently established between the University of Adelaide and University of Copenhagen.

These PhD projects will be part of a recently funded Australian Research Council Discovery Project, involving several senior and postdoctoral scientists. The successful candidates will work closely with this diverse and highly skilled group of international researchers. This new project is using fossils, ancient DNA and computational models to determine the ecological processes that (i) drive the structure and dynamics of species ranges and (ii) regulate the risk of extinction from global change. The successful candidates will also have access to state-of-the art computational facilities, recently compiled fossil records, paleoclimatic simulations and paleo genetic data.

 
 
G
M
T
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Text-to-speech function is limited to 200 characters
 
[removed]
 
Options : History : Feedback : Donate Close

November 09, 2017

New ARC Discovery Project awarded lead CI Damien Fordham

DP180102392: Reconstructing mechanisms of range contraction to avert species extinctions.

Dr Damien Fordham; Associate Professor Jeremy Austin; Associate Professor David Nogues-Bravo; Professor Carsten Rahbek; Professor Mark Lomolino

 

This project aims to integrate biotic information from fossils and ancient DNA of vertebrates into computational models to establish ecological processes that drive the structure and dynamics of geographical ranges and regulate the severity of species extinction rates from global change. This approach is likely to improve theory on dynamic species borders and expected outcomes include providing a framework for better allocating resources for endangered species in Australia and beyond. This will have significant benefits, such as providing the first mechanistic explanations for the principal drivers of mega-fauna extinctions during the late Pleistocene and Holocene.

September 11, 2017

PhD stipends with a top-up of $5000/year on: Spatiotemporal modelling of the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat

Be part of a team of scientist, government and conservation agency members, and other graduate students working on the ecology and management of the largest burrowing herbivore in the world. The highly visible  warrens and burrows of Southern Hairy-nosed Wombats, which can be seen from space, makes them an ideal model species for testing the latest developments in modelling species range dynamics under climate and land-use change. These approaches combine information from spatiotemporal statistics, genomics and demographic models into computer simulations to better understand responses of species to global change and to inform spatial wildlife decision making.

 

Attractive opportunities for two PhD students with field work in remote parts of Australia’s deserts are now available in a broader project aiming to predict the future of the Southern Hairy-nosed Wombat and identify key conservation priorities. To do this we are combining existing data on current and past warren distributions, and species abundances, with 40 years of continuous abundance indicators, using statistical and mechanistic models.  We are envisioning independently testing this modelling framework across different time horizons using inference of population change from molecular log books. The project will contribute to the related fields of ecological modelling, global change biology, conservation management and biogeography. Students will be hosted at the University of Adelaide’s School for Biological Sciences and will be supervised by a team of leading scientists in the fields of quantitative ecology, climate change science, macroecology, genomics & evolutionary biology, zoology and spatial sciences. The university proudly delivers postgraduate education, training and research with both national relevance and global outreach.

 

Interested candidates are encouraged to start the application process as soon as possible by emailing your CV and research ambitions to any of the supervisory panel members indicated below. You should have:

 

 A commitment to research excellence                                                                   

 Demonstrated statistical and spatial data analysis skills

 Excellent time management and interpersonal skills

 Evidence of well-developed verbal and written communication skills

 

Qualifications: BSc with Honours or a Master’s degree in ecology or related disciplines

 

Salary: Stipends of $26,288/yr +$5,000/yr (AUD) are available to suitably qualified candidates.

 

If you would like to know more about these positions, please contact Dr Damien Fordham (damien.fordham@adelaide.edu.au); Dr. David Taggart (David.Taggart@adelaide.edu.au), Dr. Stuart Brown (s.brown@adelaide.edu.au), or Dr. Bertram Ostendorf (Bertram.Ostendorf@adelaide.edu.au)

November 30, 2016

Dual award PhD stipends: eco-evolutionary dynamics and macroecology

Dual award PhD degrees are now available in the related fields of ecological modelling, global change biology and biogeography at the University of Adelaide’s School for Biological Sciences, with joint external supervision from staff at the University of Copenhagen’s Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate (CMEC).

We are currently looking for enthusiast PhD students to work on multi-disciplinary projects that are improving our understanding of how the geographical ranges of species contract and erode biodiversity. These projects are utilizing the latest developments in quantitative ecology, paleoclimatology, geochronology and genomics to establish the processes that drive species to contract their ranges in response to climate change, overexploitation and habitat modification. To do this we are reconstructing the past range dynamics of vertebrates and plants using models, fossils and species genes. The research outputs will be used to directly inform the conservation and management of future biodiversity.

November 23, 2016

Dr Stuart Brown joins the team

Today Dr Stuart Brown joined the lab today, bringing strong GIS and spatial analysis skills to the team. Stuart will be working part time on an ARC Linkage Project focused on better managing invasive species and part time on a ARC Discovery Project (with Prof Tom Wigley) focused on climate dynamics.  His primary tasks for the LP will include a spatiotemporal analyses of the Australia-wide spotlight count data we compiled over the last few years.

October 31, 2016

Honours Projects: Global Change Biology; Climate Change Ecology & Macroecology

A number of honours projects are available in the areas of climate change ecology, global change impacts on biodiversity, species range dynamics and extinction processes. Examples of some of these are listed below:

Management strategies for mitigating climate change impacts on frogs.

Recently we developed species’ range dynamics models for 24 frogs in the protected Wet Tropics of Queensland UNESCO World Heritage Area. These models showed that 4 species face extinction by 2080 due to human-induced climate change. However, the research also showed that for at least three species, there might be more time than first expected for conservation managers to intervene successfully. The next step in this on-going research project is to use these range dynamics models to compare the efficacy of different on-ground management interventions, including the translocation of frogs to more suitable environments.

Mapping the pace and stability of past climate change in Australia

Climate metrics, such as the speed of climate change and frequency of extreme events, can be used to estimate the influence of climate shifts on poorly described (ecologically) species, which represent most of the Earth’s biodiversity. Therefore ecologists are using climate metrics with an increasing frequency to forecast future biological responses to climate change. In this project we are using PaleoView, a climate analysis and viewing tool that we recently developed, to map the speed and magnitude of climate change since the last glacial maximum (approximately 21,000 years ago) for marine and terrestrial systems in Australia. This information will be used to identify areas of high and low climate stability and quantify their relative effect on macro-ecological patterns.

Modelling the effects of climate change on the range dynamics of plants

For the last few years we have been modelling the past distributions of plant species using physiological models. Recently we independently tested predictions of climate-driven range shifts from these models using the fossil record. These validation tests showed that our physiological models tend to do a good job at predicting ‘real-world’ range shifts in response to past climate change. There is now opportunity to use these good performing models to investigate the impacts of likely future climate change on the range area and movement of plants.

Please reload